Posts Tagged ‘Music’

Don’t Panic (Update)

Thursday, September 10th, 2009

Yesterday (09/09/09, by the way) Apple released iTunes 9. Unfortunately it has a nasty bug that prevents iVolume from analyzing new songs that are added to the iTunes library in most cases.

We put highest priority on this issue. All other projects have been interrupted in order to restore full compatibility with iTunes 9 as soon as possible. We already found a solution and are currently busy implementing it.Ā Things look good so far.

So please be patient, a new version of iVolume will be released very soon.

Update: The problem is solved. Please download and install the latest version of iVolume.

Hell froze over

Tuesday, January 13th, 2009

This is great news. Really great news.

At their Macworld 2009 keynote Apple announced that the iTunes Store will become DRM-free. This sounds a bit unspectacular first, but I think this is a revolution. Finally the music labels understood that people don’t want to be restricted in the use of their purchased songs. With DRM you can’t do everything with your purchased songs that you want. Sure, you can play your purchased song … at least on the computer where you’ve bought it. šŸ˜‰ But as soon as you want to play it anywhere else, things start to get complicated. You may have to authorize other computers. You may be limited to specific MP3 players. Your standalone player or audio streaming solution may not be supported. And so on. Basically you have some sort of copy protection, so theĀ samplesĀ of the song can not be replicated (or read) by third party software. And this opens a wide range of other problems one might not think of first: You can not use your songs in applications (or other solutions) that want to do something with the audio information of your song that’s different from “just playing”. E.g. audio or movie editors. Or DJ software Ā that does some “special playing” like scratching and mixing. And finally such great applications like iVolume that tries to enhance your music just won’t work with copy protected songs. That’s because these applications need to read out the raw sample data from the audio files to do their work, e.g. analyze the loudness in case of iVolume. But that’s not possible for copy protected songs. If it would be possible to read the raw sample data … then it simply won’t be a copy protection anymore! Because any application could just take the samples and export them to another non-copy-protected audio file.

So, removing the DRM from iTunes is really great news for all iVolume users! Finally all songs can be adjusted by iVolume to the perfect level. Apple offers the possibility to update already purchased songs with DRM to the DRM-free and higher quality “iTunes Plus” version at 30 Cent per song.